You have probably seen them, the slabbed coins that either say “Genuine” or “Details” instead of an actual grade like you are generally used to. PCGS and NGC have slightly different ways of dealing with problem coins. PCGS considers these “Genuine,” while NGC calls them “Details.” Both mean essentially the same thing.

PCGS

                If someone sends a problem coin to PCGS, it will either a.) be slabbed as “Genuine” or b.) be placed into a “body bag,” arriving unslabbed, likely because the coin is counterfeit. In the past, PCGS put every “Genuine” coin into a body bag and sent it back to the sender unslabbed and ungraded. Fortunately, the company has, for the last several years, placed most problem coins in a slab with the “Genuine grade.” These coins still have verified authenticity and even come with the certification number. That means problem coins can still circulate just as any other PCGS graded coin would. You can even include these coins in your PCGS Set Registry, just without any additional points as with non-“Genuine” examples. While these coins do not get the general numerical grades, they do receive a basic “grade” based on the surface of the coin and the amount of wear the coin has seen. As an example, you can have a cleaned coined with “MS Details” if the coin has been immaculately preserved, but unfortunately, cleaned. PCGS only “grades” these coins with the basic letter but does not give the coin a numerical grade. If a coin with “MS Details” did not have a problem with it, it would grade somewhere between 60-70.

PCGS Codes

                PCGS has different codes to go along with the problems on the coins. The following is a list of codes:

90: Not Genuine (Will not be slabbed)

91: Artificial Toning/Coloring

92: Cleaned

93: Planchet Flaw

94: Doctored/Altered

95: Severely Scratched or Damaged/Rim Damage

96: Tokens/Non-coins (Will not be slabbed)

97: Environmental Damage

98: General Damage

99: PVC Damage (Will not be slabbed)

NGC

                NGC called problem coins “Details” coins instead of “Genuine,” but both programs are very similar. Like PCGS, NGC gives the coin a letter grade, but avoids numerical grades for problem coins. NGC Details coins have verified authenticity and also have the certification number. Unlike PCGS, however, NGC does not use codes and instead uses more precise descriptions of the problem on the coin, such as “Damaged, Improperly Cleaned, PVC Damage, Chopmarked, Altered Mintmark, etc.

Some people find “Genuine” or “Details” coins to be bad, but I personally disagree. A problem coin slabbed by PCGS or NGC still has more value than a raw example and also verifies the authenticity and places it in a nice slab for protection.                You have probably seen them, the slabbed coins that either say “Genuine” or “Details” instead of an actual grade like you are generally used to. PCGS and NGC have slightly different ways of dealing with problem coins. PCGS considers these “Genuine,” while NGC calls them “Details.” Both mean essentially the same thing.

PCGS

                If someone sends a problem coin to PCGS, it will either a.) be slabbed as “Genuine” or b.) be placed into a “body bag,” arriving unslabbed, likely because the coin is counterfeit. In the past, PCGS put every “Genuine” coin into a body bag and sent it back to the sender unslabbed and ungraded. Fortunately, the company has, for the last several years, placed most problem coins in a slab with the “Genuine grade.” These coins still have verified authenticity and even come with the certification number. That means problem coins can still circulate just as any other PCGS graded coin would. You can even include these coins in your PCGS Set Registry, just without any additional points as with non-“Genuine” examples. While these coins do not get the general numerical grades, they do receive a basic “grade” based on the surface of the coin and the amount of wear the coin has seen. As an example, you can have a cleaned coined with “MS Details” if the coin has been immaculately preserved, but unfortunately, cleaned. PCGS only “grades” these coins with the basic letter but does not give the coin a numerical grade. If a coin with “MS Details” did not have a problem with it, it would grade somewhere between 60-70.

PCGS Codes

                PCGS has different codes to go along with the problems on the coins. The following is a list of codes:

90: Not Genuine (Will not be slabbed)

91: Artificial Toning/Coloring

92: Cleaned

93: Planchet Flaw

94: Doctored/Altered

95: Severely Scratched or Damaged/Rim Damage

96: Tokens/Non-coins (Will not be slabbed)

97: Environmental Damage

98: General Damage

99: PVC Damage (Will not be slabbed)

NGC

                NGC called problem coins “Details” coins instead of “Genuine,” but both programs are very similar. Like PCGS, NGC gives the coin a letter grade, but avoids numerical grades for problem coins. NGC Details coins have verified authenticity and also have the certification number. Unlike PCGS, however, NGC does not use codes and instead uses more precise descriptions of the problem on the coin, such as “Damaged, Improperly Cleaned, PVC Damage, Chopmarked, Altered Mintmark, etc.

Some people find “Genuine” or “Details” coins to be bad, but I personally disagree. A problem coin slabbed by PCGS or NGC still has more value than a raw example and also verifies the authenticity and places it in a nice slab for protection.